Why Watch Classic Anime?

Why Watch Classic Anime?

Classic Anime - Dirty PairThe other day, someone asked me, “Why do you watch so much old anime?”  I found it to be a good question because watching anime from the 80’s certainly isn’t something that will increase blog traffic.  Indeed, I’d say that so much blogging about the original Mobile Suit Gundam and Urusei Yatsura are a drag on the blog.  After all, how many younger anime fans are even remotely interested in a 20+ year old anime?  Not that many.  If that’s the case, why do it?

Although I grew up in the 80’s, the fact that most of the classic anime titles I’m blogging are 80’s anime titles plays little role in my desire to watch them (Castle of Cagliostro and Dirty Pair being notable exceptions).  My interest in most classic anime titles stemmed directly from some modern anime I happened to be watching or modern manga I happened to be reading.  Often, the modern anime or manga would either have a joke or some other reference to a classic series.  In the case of Del Rey manga, translator notes would explain how this reference applied to the classic anime series and that was great. However, almost all R1 anime and western manga have no such translator notes and thus the audience is left up to their own devices on the classic references.

Here are some examples.

The former TokyoPop manga title Sgt. Frog contains a number of references to Gundam, primarily with the Gundam models used.  The manga also contained references to Urusei Yatsura.  The anime contained further references to Space Battleship Yamato.

In the Genshiken manga, Gundam again plays a major role as the members of Genshiken not only built Gundam models, but there were iconic lines from the original Mobile Suit Gundam which are quoted in Genshiken.  Other anime and manga titles referenced in Genshiken are Tenchi Muyo! Ryo-ohki, Azumanga Daioh, Fullmetal Alchemist, Lupin III: Castle of Cagliostro, Neon Genesis Evangelion, and many others.

In Hayate the Combat Butler (thinking of the manga primarily), again Mobile Suit Gundam is heavily referenced.  Titles like Sailor Moon, Pretty Cure, Detective Conan, Dragonball Z, Neon Genesis Evangelion, and many others are referenced.  The first Hayate anime series goes absolutely nuts on making references to other anime and manga series whether old or new.

Recently, the Ah! My Goddess manga made a major reference to the character Char from Mobile Suit Gundam.

Were I to take the time, I could provide an even greater list of modern anime and manga titles that referenced classic anime series.

So, by going back and watching these classic titles, I have a better appreciation for the modern title reference.  This is especially true for modern anime/manga comedy series where the joke involves a classic reference. Indeed, as I’ve been watching Mobile Suit Gundam, every time a line is spoken or Gundam model appears and I remember it from Hayate, Genshiken, or the like, I can’t help but smile.  I’m being educated on how anime has progressed over the years and how modern manga-ka and anime producers were influenced.

As to blogging these classic titles, I find that based on traffic patterns, there are people like myself who become curious about some referenced classic anime title and thus begin doing their own research.  They then find an episode blog about some of these series and hopefully pick up a thing or two.  So, even though I would love to have massive traffic like the biggest anime blog sites have, I also see how blogging classic series has its place in the anime blogosphere.

Hopefully, I entice a few others along the way to give a classic a try.  ^_^

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

32 Responses to “Why Watch Classic Anime?”

  1. As someone who grew up in the 80s myself, I can understand your appreciation for classic anime. The giants in the industry today all had to start somewhere and it is interesting to see how their work has progressed over the years. I am a very big fan of the classics and have just started my own blog dedicated to just classic anime at http://saturdayanime20.blogspot.com. Why not come visit!

  2. junior says:

    While most modern series have callbacks to previous classics, one in particular stands head and shoulders above the others in this regard. Martian Successor Nadesico, a well-known series from the mid-’90s, was practically built on callbacks, spoofs, and parodies of earlier series. I’ve heard it said that the series has so many that even long-time Japanese anime fans invariably ended up missing some of them. The series was good enough that it could stand on its own feet, and a viewer could enjoy it while remaining oblivious to all of the references. But being aware of what had come before added a lot of fun to the experience of watching the series.

  3. Emperor J says:

    I can definitely agree with classic shows not being a massive traffic driver based on personal experience. It all just comes down to what a writer wants to write about. I don’t think traffic really validates a site anyway as there are numerous sites that get tons of hits that aren’t very good.

  4. hearthesea says:

    People in any medium are inevitably influenced by what came before them. It’s always really interesting to see how someone’s favourite book/film/etc clearly influenced or shaped their own work, and then how they go on to do the same for the next generation. It’s an endless cycle.

    In regard to Anime, I recently saw a little of the classic ‘Ashita no Joe’ (which ran in the early 70’s, I think). It’s no secret how this series influenced the modern, popular ‘Hajime no Ippo’, so it was great to watch it and think about their similarities and contrasting points. One of my favourites in the Manga world is Naoki Urasawa, and he has gone on record as saying that he adores Osama Tezuka’s work and still holds it up as a standard to reach for, a sort of mark of the highest quality in the medium. I haven’t read much of Tezuka’s work (only a bit of ‘Phoenix’) but I bet there are marks of his influence all over Urasawa’s stuff, even when putting aside the obvious example of ‘Pluto’. This issue also reminds me of the fantasy genre in fiction — people can read all sorts of modern works, but if they haven’t read Tolkien’s books then they will have little idea of just how many of these modern works either emulate or react against his style. (And there are so, so many.)

    On a more superficial note, I have to also say that I usually prefer the art style of a lot of older Anime…that’s a generalisation of course, as not every series has the same appearance, but I prefer that detailed, sort of dark and ‘earthy’ quality that many old series’ have, in comparison to the much softer, lighter style commonly employed these days.

  5. aznable says:

    i’ll be straight with you i think it’s stupid elitism to watch stuff you’re not really into just so you can show off when you know a reference
    these shows are called the classics for a reason and if you’re not watching them for that why bother at all

  6. wow…I guess there aren’t many people that can find such references ^^
    I don’t really know any “classic anime” except for maybe Mononoke Hime (could that be considered classic because nearly everyone who’s into anime has watched it?) or other Ghibli movies 🙂

  7. mr.Poneis says:

    Without enough love for what you do, a person is just a maniac right? Getta watch/read them all!

    Adapted from some quote of Sanzenin Nagi on chapter 161 of Hayate no Gotoku… and some pokemon too

    see ya
    mr.poneis

    ps.: I may say this, but the quantity of animes and mangas that just seems to increase more and more… Gosh…

  8. O-chan says:

    Being a classic anime fan I feel that a lot more creativity and passion were put into titles that came out during the 80’s-early 90’s. For example with Urusei Yastura was the beginning of Mamoru Oshii’s (Ghost in the Shell/Blood) career and it’s nice to have a point of reference for his evolution as a director.

    But see I’m an old man buy the modern anime fan standards. The people who were fans during my college days had an appreciation for the artistic detail and creative writing many classic series utilized. Around the 90’s anime started to become more manufactured and generic so it seemed to make projects that took things in a different direction standout more (like Cowboy Bebop and Evangelion). As stated, it was older anime that got college buddies interested in the study of film, writing, and other things.

    The modern anime that comes out now it seems those qualities that were so abundant in the 80’s just became diluted. With the advent of the computer you don’t feel the blood and sweat that was put into the animation.

    I think it’s good that you blog older anime because not many people do it and you do balance it out with more modern tastes. Besides that, with UY going out of print might as well give the series a little more exposure before the last hurrah.

  9. AstroNerdBoy says:

    I am a very big fan of the classics and have just started my own blog dedicated to just classic anime…

    You know, I do have an old VHS copy of Lensmen with an English dub but would much rather have a Japanese audio version with accurate subtitles.

    Martian Successor Nadesico, a well-known series from the mid-’90s, was practically built on callbacks, spoofs, and parodies of earlier series.

    While I’ve watched this anime, unfortunately I had no appreciation for the parodies/tributes/etc. I may have to give that a look-see again although I don’t think I have it any more. 🙁

    (As an aside, I bet if I repurchased Excel Saga, I’d better appreciate that too.)

    OK, I’ll be back in a few hours to respond to more comments. The small window that opened in my busy time suddenly closed on me. ^_^;;;;

  10. AstroNerdBoy says:

    I can definitely agree with classic shows not being a massive traffic driver based on personal experience. It all just comes down to what a writer wants to write about. I don’t think traffic really validates a site anyway as there are numerous sites that get tons of hits that aren’t very good.

    *lol* OK, good point. That said, I would certainly love it if I had 10K/day traffic or even more but as you also say, I’m writing what I want to write about. As such, there’s a tradeoff and clearly I’ve made that call in favor of classic anime titles.

  11. AstroNerdBoy says:

    Negima! spoiler work done, time to get focused again before bed. ^_^;

    People in any medium are inevitably influenced by what came before them. It’s always really interesting to see how someone’s favourite book/film/etc clearly influenced or shaped their own work, and then how they go on to do the same for the next generation. It’s an endless cycle.

    Very true. However, while in terms of U.S. works, I don’t think it is often as clear as it seems to be with anime and manga. Could be just me though.

    In regard to Anime, I recently saw a little of the classic ‘Ashita no Joe’ (which ran in the early 70’s, I think).

    This title came onto my radar some time back. It may have been School Rumble or Hayate the Combat Butler but there was a direct reference to it with how one of the characters acted (going ashen white and sitting as if a defeated boxer). So I did do a little bit of research back then and thought it would be interesting to give that a look-see.

    This issue also reminds me of the fantasy genre in fiction — people can read all sorts of modern works, but if they haven’t read Tolkien’s books then they will have little idea of just how many of these modern works either emulate or react against his style. (And there are so, so many.)

    Ah! You cite the one perfect example. Heck, D&D and indeed all role playing games can trace their roots back to Tolkien. And as you say, many modern works are influenced too.

    On a more superficial note, I have to also say that I usually prefer the art style of a lot of older Anime…that’s a generalisation of course, as not every series has the same appearance, but I prefer that detailed, sort of dark and ‘earthy’ quality that many old series’ have, in comparison to the much softer, lighter style commonly employed these days.

    I like how clean and crisp things look today vs. yesterday but I do understand your point. When TM!R OVA 3 came out, that conversion from cell to CGI art was tough for many to get over and indeed, even I had some issues (Ryoko’s ears for one).

  12. AstroNerdBoy says:

    i’ll be straight with you i think it’s stupid elitism to watch stuff you’re not really into just so you can show off when you know a reference
    these shows are called the classics for a reason and if you’re not watching them for that why bother at all

    I wanted to address your comment separately Aznable because I think it is a good issue you raise but there appear to be misconceptions that I want to clear up as well.

    For starters, when you say, “i think it’s stupid elitism to watch stuff you’re not really into just so you can show off when you know a reference,” is that what you think I’m doing? If so, then you haven’t been reading my blog entries on these classics.

    Take Mobile Suit Gundam for example. I’ll be straight with you — I’ve NEVER been a mecha fan. ^_^; I remember back in Japan telling Robert that I thought mecha was pretty dumb though I did get a kick out of the live-action Robot Jox back in the day. Despite this, I’ve watched tons of mecha titles mainly because I want to (1)educate myself on the genre and (2) find out what others like about the genre. In the process, I’ve come to enjoy several mecha titles but I still wouldn’t call myself a mecha fan.

    Indeed, the reason I put Mobile Suit Gundam off for so long was because it IS a mecha title. *lol* Now that I’m watching it, I’m finding a rather nice gem; not a perfect one mind you but nice just the same. However, in order for me to appreciate this gem, I first had to be enticed by the massive influence it has clearly had on manga-ka and anime production teams. The fact that I now know a reference and can help educate others is just icing on the cake.

    Still, just because an anime is called a “classic” doesn’t mean I’ll be interested just like a ton of modern anime titles don’t interest me in the slightest. However, if a classic clearly is influential in Japanese society, then as a student of Japanese culture, I am interested in seeing how that classic became influential.

    I hope that clears some things up (and I hope I didn’t run out of space).

  13. AstroNerdBoy says:

    I don’t really know any “classic anime” except for maybe Mononoke Hime (could that be considered classic because nearly everyone who’s into anime has watched it?) or other Ghibli movies 🙂

    “Classic anime” is something I’d define as being at least 20-years old or older. Mononoke Hime isn’t quite there yet but it is destined for the classic shelves as are most of Miyazaki-sensei’s works. Lupin III: Castle of Cagliostro and Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind I’d consider classics for sure. ^_^

    Without enough love for what you do, a person is just a maniac right? Getta watch/read them all!

    *lol* Almost. Certainly, if I start a series, I gotta watch them all to be fair.

    Being a classic anime fan I feel that a lot more creativity and passion were put into titles that came out during the 80’s-early 90’s. For example with Urusei Yastura was the beginning of Mamoru Oshii’s (Ghost in the Shell/Blood) career and it’s nice to have a point of reference for his evolution as a director.

    Now that’s an interesting take which I had not gone. I rarely follow anime directors though I am aware of some names and obviously like manga-ka, they are influenced by other works. That said, what if their earlier creations IS an influential work as you cited? That’s rather nifty to follow how their career as evolved, especially when they created other well known titles.

    But see I’m an old man buy the modern anime fan standards.

    Ditto.

    The people who were fans during my college days had an appreciation for the artistic detail and creative writing many classic series utilized.

    I was only around one anime fan back in my young man days and indeed, he’s been the only friend I’ve ever had to be hardcore anime fan. But he was a fan of cartoon arts as a whole to include not only anime and manga and DC and Marvel comic books, but he also loved lesser known stuff from Dark Horse as well as cartoons from the U.S. and Europe. Like me, he was also a big classic cartoon fan (30’s and 40’s Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and the like). That said, I do seem to remember him saying why he liked anime so much more than any other cartoon was because of the artistic detail (though he didn’t put it in quite those terms).

    I think it’s good that you blog older anime because not many people do it and you do balance it out with more modern tastes. Besides that, with UY going out of print might as well give the series a little more exposure before the last hurrah.

    Well, the fact that not many others blog the classics was one reason I decided to go ahead and do it. Plus, I find that searching for UY (as an example) will end up going through tons of my blog reviews on the anime (which is why I need to keep pushing myself and get the rest of those older posts with busted images fixed).

  14. O-chan says:

    I was only around one anime fan back in my young man days and indeed, he’s been the only friend I’ve ever had to be hardcore anime fan. But he was a fan of cartoon arts as a whole to include not only anime and manga and DC and Marvel comic books, but he also loved lesser known stuff from Dark Horse as well as cartoons from the U.S. and Europe. Like me, he was also a big classic cartoon fan (30’s and 40’s Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and the like). That said, I do seem to remember him saying why he liked anime so much more than any other cartoon was because of the artistic detail (though he didn’t put it in quite those terms).

    This sounds more like how I am. I actually do not put anime on the same pedestal that I did in my early fan days. But I think that’s because American animation became far more diverse and appealing. It’s kind of funny but while Japan’s creativity has dwindled America’s has spread out and you have a lot of American animation being written for an all ages audience and having a lot of “getting crap past the radar” moments much like Looney Tunes and Flintstones did back in the day. Nevermind, all the stuff that is clearly made for college age and up.

    Now I still haven’t had the same opinion of the American comic book medium. The only series I’ve heavily loved are Sonic the Hedgehog (the current writer takes things in a very unique direction), The Sandman (totally recommend), Bone, Watchmen, and TMNT. It’s not that I think that Marvel and DC’s line is worthless, it’s just that it feels like I’m dedicating myself to a soap opera. The storylines have been going on through the decades and the material is so vast and dense that it’s just overwhelming. Yes, a lot of manga (especially the current Shonen Jump headliners) go on for a long time but at least the storylines are linear and focused on one continuity (reasons why I refuse to restart my fandom of TMNT).

    But overall I do think that a lot of classic anime created the foundation of quality that the industry takes for granted these days (with notable exceptions).

  15. Someone asking you why you watch old anime would be like someone asking why you like classic rock or old movies and TV shows. Some things are just great classics that never get old. Personally, I’ve always liked the animation styles prevalent in the 80s & early 90s. There’s just something about that hand-drawn animation that feels more authentic than modern digital animation. Sure, 21st century anime does benefit from generally higher production values, but older titles like Mobile Suit Gundam, Bubblegum Crisis, Macross, Project A-ko, Ranma, and Akira that makes them just as enjoyable as anything more modern. If something is good, it doesn’t stop being good just because it gets older.

  16. Krono says:

    While we’re on the subject of classics that influenced more modern authors, you might want to check out Kinnikuman at some point. I haven’t read it myself, but it’s a series that several manga-ka that started late 90s/early 00’s list as having influenced them.

  17. aznable says:

    if you took offense that I said you’re doing it to show off then whatever
    but you admit that you don’t even like mecha and are only watching it for educational reasons or whatever and that’s elitism
    elitists don’t watch anime with a passion but they love to talk about how they know all the details and references which is why i said it’s just showing off
    if you can win trivia contests it doesn’t mean your love for anime is greater
    you even said a classic is just something old enough but it’s actually something that’s great enough to still pack a major punch even now like gundam
    people are referencing it because it’s a really great show that people love and if you don’t really feel that then knowing references from it means nothing and you’re wasting your time watching it

  18. AstroNerdBoy says:

    …you have a lot of American animation being written for an all ages audience and having a lot of “getting crap past the radar” moments much like Looney Tunes and Flintstones did back in the day.

    Don’t look but they are rebooting Looney Tunes. It is AWFUL. One of the things I read is that they can’t get the same kind of jokes from the 30’s and 40’s past today’s executives and thus the new Looney Tunes is like some crappy sitcom. *_*

    It’s not that I think that Marvel and DC’s line is worthless, it’s just that it feels like I’m dedicating myself to a soap opera.

    Interesting. “Soap opera” never came to my mind when I stopped reading Marvel/DC in the mid-90’s but that may be the case today. That said, as I think back, “soap opera” could have applied back then too.

    Regardless, I don’t like American comic books because the stories shift depending on the writer. The art can be good at times and then go crazy bad. At least in manga, the art is mostly consistent (bearing in mind how a manga-ka can change character designs over the years) and the stories don’t radically change for the most part (Love Hina is a rare exception because the manga was apparently forced to continue).


    But overall I do think that a lot of classic anime created the foundation of quality that the industry takes for granted these days (with notable exceptions).

    Yeah, I agree.

    Someone asking you why you watch old anime would be like someone asking why you like classic rock or old movies and TV shows. Some things are just great classics that never get old.

    I think the person who e-mailed me was fairly young. I figured they may have come to the blog for something newer and then saw all this “old” stuff when there’s so much new stuff out there that I’m not blogging.

    Sure, 21st century anime does benefit from generally higher production values, but older titles like Mobile Suit Gundam, Bubblegum Crisis, Macross, Project A-ko, Ranma, and Akira that makes them just as enjoyable as anything more modern.

    When I read this, I thought about how higher production values in live-action titles don’t automatically make them better.

    Take Star Wars as an example. For its time, the special effects and overall production value were incredible. However, Lucas has often made mention of the fact that he was unable to do a lot of what he wanted to do back then. The result ended up being a better-written script/story.

    With his later prequel trilogy, he had the incredible production values that are most impressive. So visually, he did what he wanted but then the stories suffered as a result.

    While we’re on the subject of classics that influenced more modern authors, you might want to check out Kinnikuman at some point. I haven’t read it myself, but it’s a series that several manga-ka that started late 90s/early 00’s list as having influenced them.

    Yeah, this title has come on my radar before. I’m thinking [b]School Rumble[/b] referenced it a few times.

  19. AstroNerdBoy says:

    aznable said…

    if you took offense that I said you’re doing it to show off then whatever

    No, I didn’t take offense. I don’t think what I wrote in response gives that vibe, or at least it isn’t supposed to. ^_^;

    but you admit that you don’t even like mecha and are only watching it for educational reasons or whatever and that’s elitism

    And you cut out the part about how I’ve found gems in the process. Even if it wasn’t, that’s not elitism. You are equating education as elitist notion. I disagree. I want to know things. I’m not content to just sit like a mindless drone and be spoon-fed stuff. I like knowing.

    That’s why Del Rey’s manga always having translator notes rocked for me. I was able to learn things and thus better appreciate the manga I was reading. I want to know what things are referenced and that’s why I wish Viz would have translator notes for Hayate the Combat Butler.

    elitists don’t watch anime with a passion but they love to talk about how they know all the details and references which is why i said it’s just showing off

    Are you sure about that? I know you are beating about the bush to accuse me of being an elitist (which I don’t accept by the way ^_^) but if I were, you don’t think there is passion of some sort there? If a braggart truly knows the thing he is bragging about, then there had to be a passion of some kind to spend all that time and effort gaining the knowledge to brag about it. It might be misplaced passion but its still passion.

    if you can win trivia contests it doesn’t mean your love for anime is greater

    Well, I don’t do trivia contests so…^_~

    you even said a classic is just something old enough but it’s actually something that’s great enough to still pack a major punch even now like gundam

    Um, what I was saying is that in order to be a classic anime, it needs to be 20+ years old. The title referenced, Mononoke Hime isn’t quite there yet. I was only referring to age for that specific reference. I wasn’t stating that this was the only criteria for a classic anime. I could have written it better so that your confusion was avoided and I do apologize for that. Sometimes, I forget that not everyone will see the presumed stuff. ^_^;;;

    people are referencing it because it’s a really great show that people love and if you don’t really feel that then knowing references from it means nothing and you’re wasting your time watching it

    And this is where you are 100% wrong but then much of this seems to stem from certain presumptions you have on me and the apparent negative light you view me in.

    By your words, if manga I read and enjoy or anime I watch and enjoy make references to Gundam, because I’m not a mecha fan, no matter HOW curious I am to learn more, I shouldn’t learn it because that’s elitism and being a showoff.

    Forget the fact that my enjoyment of Sgt Frog, Hayate the Combat Butler, Genshiken, etc. is ENHANCED by my watching Gundam Oh no! I’m wasting my time. Never mind that because I wanted to learn more and get the jokes/references/whatever that I found a show I now enjoy a great deal and would have missed out on if I had not followed my curiosity. Nope, watching Gundam has been a waste of time by your (elitist) standards. ^_~

    Hopefully, I didn’t offend you with my words and at the same time, hopefully I’ve made some things clear. ^_^

  20. aznable says:

    of course i’m not offended by being compared to a mindless drone whatever made you think that
    i’m sure you know a lot about me to make claims as if i don’t like knowing things
    i never said education was elitist but studying something without your heart in it is because then you’re just going through the motions to look good
    i didn’t say elitists don’t have passion but it’s not about anime as much as it’s about always looking better than the average guy
    now how is it seeing you in a negative light when i simply see that you’re looking at gundam the wrong way and it’s you who’s taking that personally
    you know man i’m not telling you to not watch gundam or whatever i just think you’re not doing it with the right attitude and because of that you’re missing out on what makes this a great anime for those of us who love it
    it’s great if you can enjoy other anime more as a result but because your interest is academic you’re out of touch with what makes gundam tick because it’s about the heart of the entire package as a whole not some details you can maybe spot in other shows now

  21. AstroNerdBoy says:

    Well, we are just going to go ’round and ’round so I’m going to skip ahead.

    it’s great if you can enjoy other anime more as a result but because your interest is academic you’re out of touch with what makes gundam tick because it’s about the heart of the entire package as a whole not some details you can maybe spot in other shows now

    If this is true, then why aren’t you pointing it out in my Gundam episode reviews? ^_~

  22. aznable says:

    i’m talking abut it here because i read some of your reviews and i couldn’t put my finger on what felt off about them so i held off commenting
    i didn’t get around to saying my peace until you revealed here that you don’t even like mecha and you’re watching gundam for other reasons than the show itself and that explained it
    if you don’t get what i’ve been saying i can’t explain it to you
    there’s no point in me talking about specific things when your whole approach to gundam is wrong footed
    don’t let me stop you from watching gundam if you think it helps you with something else but it’s a real waste watching it this way

  23. AstroNerdBoy says:

    Except I’m watching Gundam no differently than I watch ANY other anime series. My reviews are the same. The only difference might be when I point out that “OH! There’s a scene I recognize being referenced in Genshiken.” Beyond that, and those are rare events, there’s no difference.

  24. aznable says:

    how is it no different when you said yourself you’re watching it for education background and to get the references in other shows?
    i’ve never watched any anime with that kind of narrow mindset and no one i know does it like that
    the fact is if you’re not watching gundam for itself and because it’s a great show you’re off the mark right away
    i could immediately see that your attitude was wrong from your reviews even though i couldn’t tell why until you laid it out so yes it does show there too
    i’m getting tired of repeating myself here when obviously what i’m saying isn’t getting through because of your defensive attitude from the start

  25. AstroNerdBoy says:

    You know, at this point we are pretty sure you are trolling me but whatever. ^_^

    i’m getting tired of repeating myself here when obviously what i’m saying isn’t getting through because of your defensive attitude from the start

    This gave us all a good laugh because you’ve been busting my chops from your initial post and dismissing anything I’ve said.

    how is it no different when you said yourself you’re watching it for education background and to get the references in other shows?

    I said I STARTED watching it for educational purposes. You just assumed everything else and went downhill from there.

    i could immediately see that your attitude was wrong from your reviews even though i couldn’t tell why until you laid it out so yes it does show there too

    Cite specific examples of this “wrong attitude” and how my episode reviews of Gundam are any different from how I’ve been episode-reviewing any other series. You can’t because they don’t exist.

    What you are failing to get (whether purposeful or not, I won’t guess) is that when I watch ANYTHING, I am watching it the same way I watch everything else, whether anime or not. I have a writer’s mentality and that often comes out in my reviews. Using that same mindset, I often try to place myself in the writer’s shoes and see where he/she is going. Sometimes, I can see where the writer is taking us and make correct calls. Sometimes, I’m a bit off the mark. Sometimes, I strike out or get completely surprised.

    Regardless, whether you believe it or not, how I watch any classic anime series is no different from how I watch anything else. Wanting to know references or wanting to appreciate modern anime/manga better is only a vehicle to get me to start watching just like there are other vehicles to get me to watch other titles, good or bad. ^_^

    BTW, how can I judge something to be “great” when I’ve never watched it? What’s great to me may suck to you and what sucks to you might be great to me? “Great” is in the eye of the beholder. I found the recent Doctor Who episode “The Doctor’s Wife” to be a great episode. Many fans agreed but there were some official critics who hated it.

  26. aznable says:

    you can dismiss me as a troll but that doesn’t change that i’m right
    how is it busting your chops when i simply pointed out that you’re missing out on the heart of gundam because you’re looking at it the wrong way?
    if you didn’t like the word elitist then whatever but it fits the approach you have taken to gundam and i think it’s a stupid waste and so i said that without beating around the bush
    i only said something about your motives after you talked about them yourself but you’re attaching shady motives to me to discredit me
    if you think i’m trying to discredit you man you’re wrong again i’m trying to help you experience the full greatness of gundam
    i’m not assuming anything i’m going by what you’ve said and you said you didn’t like mecha and you’re watching gundam to educate yourself
    if you don’t get it i can’t explain it to you and if i gave you more examples you’d just brush them off too like you’re doing it now
    it’s not about examples anyway your reviews just give off the kind of wrong vibe that shows you’re not getting it
    if you honestly consider gundam to be classic anime then you already know it’s great without watching it because it couldn’t be classic otherwise
    something recent can be great too but a classic is great by definition and if you deny that about gundam you’re really not getting it at all
    gundam is not about writing lessons it’s an passionate burning experience for your heart and you’ll never get that the way you’re going about this

  27. AstroNerdBoy says:

    Once again, the vehicle that got me into Gundam (or indeed ANY other anime, manga, show, book, music, etc.) is one thing. Once I delve into said item, how I watch it, read it, listen to it, whatever is the same.

    When I’m watching Gundam, I’m not sitting thinking, “What reference will I get, George? What reference will I get? I’m getting an education, George, an education.” I watch Gundam with the same attitude and critical eye that I watch 100% of ever other anime blogged here and not blogged here. Whether you believe it or not is up to you and clearly you aren’t going to believe it.

    BTW, I don’t like mysteries either but somehow, I was convinced to read Sherlock Holmes years ago and then watch the Jeremy Brett’s Sherlock Holmes and love it. I still don’t like mysteries but I guess I watched that series and read those stories with the wrong mindset and thus my love of it is invalidated. ^_~

  28. Anonymous says:

    first of all it doesn’t work like that at all
    unless you go into it with the right attitude you
    can’t get to the heart of gundam all the way
    knowing you have a different purpose changes things
    you may not be aware of it yourself but it’s still true
    only you can change your attitude and it’s not
    up to me to change your mind if you insist you’re right
    how you watch gundam is your business in the end and
    our ideas are too different to keep talking
    my opinion is you’re doing it wrong and that’s the
    one thing you are unwilling to even consider

  29. Weirdling says:

    This has been an eye-opener for me. I remember you from as far back as the AIC board, and the way you talked always gave me the impression that you knew a lot about Japanese animation. I’m surprised to see that you’re only now slowly familiarizing yourself with the classics of anime. My lesson from this is that I should avoid taking long walls of text and recurrent claims for real knowledge. I still respect your knowledge of Tenchi because it’s been backed up by other people, but I think in general I’ll have to be more skeptical of what you say.

  30. aznable says:

    i don’t know why my name didn’t take in my last post but i think you probably could tell that it was by me

    aznable

  31. AstroNerdBoy says:

    first of all it doesn’t work like that at all
    unless you go into it with the right attitude you
    can’t get to the heart of gundam all

    Your comments were difficult to read since it was one, big, long, run-on sentence. ^_^;;;;

    The guys think I’m stupid to keep arguing with you and they are probably right. I can’t even begin to fathom how you think as you do with some vague concept of a proper attitude for watching Gundam.

    So, when Taco’s Rules got me to start watching the very funny British comedy The IT Crowd, what was my attitude supposed to be? Years ago, when fans of Tenchi Muyo! Ryo-ohki told me I should watch this “father of harem titles,” what should my attitude have been?

    Again, and for the last time, how I watch anything in my life gets judged the same way, period. If I like it, then great. If not, then great. Just because someone says, “Gundam rules!” doesn’t mean I’ll think that at all. I might but I might not. Everyone’s tastes are different.

    my opinion is you’re doing it wrong and that’s the
    one thing you are unwilling to even consider

    And you have yet to define how my viewing it IDENTICALLY TO EVERY OTHER ANIME I’VE EVER WATCHED is wrong? ^_^;;; Sorry, if you can’t do that, then how can you convince me of anything other than busting my chops and trolling? ^_~

  32. AstroNerdBoy says:

    Weirdling said…

    This has been an eye-opener for me. I remember you from as far back as the AIC board, and the way you talked always gave me the impression that you knew a lot about Japanese animation.

    I’m afraid you must have confused with someone else. ^_^;;; After all, when I came to AIC some nine years ago, I don’t think I even had a dozen anime titles under my belt. So, how you would think that someone who came in and asked tons of questions about Tenchi Muyo! Ryo-ohki and then was always looking for anime recommendations would know a lot about anime. ^_^;;;

    Now, toward the end of the AIC board’s run, I did learn enough about TM!R that I felt comfortable enough to take over the FAQ site from Death Quaker when she wanted to retire from it. The number of anime titles I’d watched had grown considerably. However, I was still fairly green on anime as a whole. Indeed, in one year, I’m not sure how I could have watched more than I did short of quitting my job & not sleeping ever again. ^_^;;;

    I’m surprised to see that you’re only now slowly familiarizing yourself with the classics of anime.

    Um, “only now?” I’ve been slowly familiarizing myself with the classics for several years now. I work them in as I have time along with whatever more modern anime title I’m watching. If you know a way I can stop time, go without sleep, or win the lottery so I’m not working tons of hours a week, I’ll be more than happy to speed up the classic watching process. ^_~

    My lesson from this is that I should avoid taking long walls of text and recurrent claims for real knowledge.

    Meaning? (I just love, generalized, vague arguments because they can mean anything. ^_^)

    I still respect your knowledge of Tenchi because it’s been backed up by other people, but I think in general I’ll have to be more skeptical of what you say.

    *LOL* Thanks for the laugh. I need it after dealing with Indians for 13 hours. ^_^

    So, if I have this right, when I knew nothing about anime and was brand new at watching it, you thought I knew a ton. Nine years later when I have done quite a bit of watching of anime, when I’ve done quite a bit of reading of manga, when I’ve talked with quite a number of people in the business and have increased my anime and manga knowledge by quite a bit, suddenly I can’t be trusted. Sorry, that makes no sense.

    Don’t get me wrong. There’s still a TON for me to learn and I’m always looking to continue my anime and manga education. The learning process will never stop. If there’s something I don’t know, I say it. However, if I write some lengthy piece, as I did for xxxHOLiC 206, I’ve done my homework. Whether you believe it or not, that’s up to you.

    Thanks for writing. ^_^

Want to comment? Leave a Reply! Some HTML (for bold, italics, etc.) permitted. Use [spoiler][/spoiler] to hide spoiler content. Block quotes are <blockquote>Text you want to quote goes here.</blockquote>. No personal attacks on other comenters, please. Spirited debate is OK though. ^_^

Powered by WordPress